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Worth Watching
  • Empires - The Medici: Godfathers of the Renaissance
    Empires - The Medici: Godfathers of the Renaissance
    A fascinating and highly entertaining look at one of the most important families of the Renaissance era--the Medici.
  • Sister Wendy - The Complete Collection (Story of Painting / Grand Tour / Odyssey / Pains of Glass)
    Sister Wendy - The Complete Collection (Story of Painting / Grand Tour / Odyssey / Pains of Glass)

    “Sister Wendy Beckett has transformed public appreciation of art through her astonishing knowledge, insight and passion for painting and painters.” This set includes Sister Wendy's Story of Painting, Sister Wendy's Odyssey, and Sister Wendy's Grand Tour. Simultaneously delightful and scholarly--this is a must have for anyone interested in art history.

  • Exit Through the Gift Shop
    Exit Through the Gift Shop
    When British stencil artist Banksy traveled to Los Angeles to work, he came across obscure French filmmaker Thierry Guetta and his badly organized collection of videotapes involving the activities of graffiti artists. Inspired, Banksy assembled them with new footage to create this talked-about documentary, and the result is a mind-boggling and odd film (so strange as to be thought a hoax by some) about outsider artists and the definition of art itself.
  • The Impressionists
    The Impressionists
    A dramatization of the Impressionist movement as seen through the eyes of Claude Monet. Highly entertaining and informative.
  • The Impressionists: The Other French Revolution
    The Impressionists: The Other French Revolution
    A very personal and revealing look at the personalities that created Impressionism.
Friday
May272016

Romare Bearden: A Communicator of Culture

Romare Bearden - Untitled (from "Prevalence of Ritual" portfolio), 1974 - Color lithograph on paper- 36 x 29 1/4 in. (91.5 x 74.3 cm) - The Joseph H. Hirshhorn Bequest, Hirshhorn Museum - Washington, D.C. (click photo for larger image)Romare Bearden (1911-1988) was an American artists, whose collages of photographs and painted paper on canvas depict aspects of American black culture in a style derived from Cubism. He is considered one of the most important African American artists of the 20th century.  In "Pepper Jelly Lady" a figure in a dashingly patterned dress is framed by a wide border filled with drawings of Southern life: a plain wooden church, a porticoed mansion, a room with a potbellied stove.

Wednesday
May252016

Quote of the Day

“What moves men of genius, or rather what inspires their work, is not new ideas, but their obsession with the idea that what has already been said is still not enough.” - Eugene Delacroix

Monday
May232016

Geoffrey of Anjou

Unknown Goldsmith, French - Tomb plaque of Geoffrey of Anjou - c. 1158 - Copper, champlevé, enamel, 63 x 33 cm (24.8 x 13 in) - Musée de Tessé, Le Mans, France (click photo for larger image)Geoffrey of Anjou (1113-1151) was the forefather of the Plantagenet dynasty of English kings. He was the Count of Maine and Anjou and the father of the future King Henry II of England. This image on an unusually large enameled plaque, which functioned as a funerary effigy, shows him not as an individual, but in an emblematic and generalized way—representative of his class. Geoffrey has a sword in his right hand and holds a tall shield with his left. The shield is emblazoned with one of the earliest representation of a coat-of-arms, consisting of four gilded lions standing on their hind legs against a blue background.

Friday
May202016

Helen Frankenthaler: Abstract Lyricism

Frankenthaler - Coral Wedge (1972) - acrylic on canvas, 81 1/2 x 46 1/2 inches, Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City, MO. (click photo for larger image)American painter Helen Frankenthaler (1928-2011) created brilliantly colored, abstract paintings, widely known for their lyricism. Within those parameters her style was continually evolving, and she’s considered a major contributor to postwar painting.

Wednesday
May182016

Did You Know?

In 1961, Matisse’s Le Bateau (The Boat) hung upside-down for 46 days in the Museum of Modern Art, New York – none of the 116,000 visitors had noticed.