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  • Empires - The Medici: Godfathers of the Renaissance
    Empires - The Medici: Godfathers of the Renaissance
    A fascinating and highly entertaining look at one of the most important families of the Renaissance era--the Medici.
  • Sister Wendy - The Complete Collection (Story of Painting / Grand Tour / Odyssey / Pains of Glass)
    Sister Wendy - The Complete Collection (Story of Painting / Grand Tour / Odyssey / Pains of Glass)

    “Sister Wendy Beckett has transformed public appreciation of art through her astonishing knowledge, insight and passion for painting and painters.” This set includes Sister Wendy's Story of Painting, Sister Wendy's Odyssey, and Sister Wendy's Grand Tour. Simultaneously delightful and scholarly--this is a must have for anyone interested in art history.

  • Exit Through the Gift Shop
    Exit Through the Gift Shop
    When British stencil artist Banksy traveled to Los Angeles to work, he came across obscure French filmmaker Thierry Guetta and his badly organized collection of videotapes involving the activities of graffiti artists. Inspired, Banksy assembled them with new footage to create this talked-about documentary, and the result is a mind-boggling and odd film (so strange as to be thought a hoax by some) about outsider artists and the definition of art itself.
  • The Impressionists
    The Impressionists
    A dramatization of the Impressionist movement as seen through the eyes of Claude Monet. Highly entertaining and informative.
  • The Impressionists: The Other French Revolution
    The Impressionists: The Other French Revolution
    A very personal and revealing look at the personalities that created Impressionism.

Entries in Michelangelo (14)

Wednesday
Mar132019

Quote of the Day

“If people knew how hard I worked to get my mastery, it wouldn't seem so wonderful at all.” - Michelangelo

Wednesday
Oct112017

Did You Know?

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo painted the fresco ceiling of the Sistine Chapel—including the most famous panel called “The Creation of Adam,” which depicts God giving life to the first man—entirely standing up. The artist invented a series of scaffolds specifically designed to attach to the chapel walls, with brackets so he and his assistants could be close enough to the ceiling to reach above their heads to work and paint.

Wednesday
May032017

Did You Know?

The marble slab that was eventually turned into the sculpture of “David” (1504) by Michelangelo was cut 43 years earlier, for an artist named Agostino di Duccio, who planned to turn it into a statue of Hercules. Di Duccio abandoned his sculpture, which was originally to be installed in a Florentine cathedral, because of the flaws in the stone. The marble was unused for 10 years until another sculptor, Antonio Rossellino, decided to work with it. Rossellino also abandoned his work because he found marble too difficult to sculpt. Michelangelo began work on his sculpture in 1501. Had he hit it just once in the wrong place—the entire piece would have shattered.

Wednesday
Aug032016

Did You Know?

Both Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo were accused of performing dissections on living people in the pursuit of their anatomical studies. For this reason Pope Leo denied permission to de Vinci to study anatomy in the hospital in Rome. As it happens...the accusations were well-founded. But, both Leonardo and Michelangelo advanced medical science with their dissections.

Wednesday
Apr062016

Did You Know?

Michelangelo painted the fresco ceiling of the Sistine Chapel—including the most famous panel called “The Creation of Adam,” which depicts God giving life to the first man—entirely standing up. The artist invented a series of scaffolds specially designed to attach to the chapel walls with brackets so he and his assistants could be close enough to the ceiling to reach above their heads to work and paint.