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  • Empires - The Medici: Godfathers of the Renaissance
    Empires - The Medici: Godfathers of the Renaissance
    A fascinating and highly entertaining look at one of the most important families of the Renaissance era--the Medici.
  • Sister Wendy - The Complete Collection (Story of Painting / Grand Tour / Odyssey / Pains of Glass)
    Sister Wendy - The Complete Collection (Story of Painting / Grand Tour / Odyssey / Pains of Glass)

    “Sister Wendy Beckett has transformed public appreciation of art through her astonishing knowledge, insight and passion for painting and painters.” This set includes Sister Wendy's Story of Painting, Sister Wendy's Odyssey, and Sister Wendy's Grand Tour. Simultaneously delightful and scholarly--this is a must have for anyone interested in art history.

  • Exit Through the Gift Shop
    Exit Through the Gift Shop
    When British stencil artist Banksy traveled to Los Angeles to work, he came across obscure French filmmaker Thierry Guetta and his badly organized collection of videotapes involving the activities of graffiti artists. Inspired, Banksy assembled them with new footage to create this talked-about documentary, and the result is a mind-boggling and odd film (so strange as to be thought a hoax by some) about outsider artists and the definition of art itself.
  • The Impressionists
    The Impressionists
    A dramatization of the Impressionist movement as seen through the eyes of Claude Monet. Highly entertaining and informative.
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    The Impressionists: The Other French Revolution
    A very personal and revealing look at the personalities that created Impressionism.

Entries in Georgia O'Keeffe (10)

Wednesday
Apr172019

Did You Know?

Georgia O'Keeffe preferred a very specific, very cramped space as her studio: a Model-A Ford. In order to shield herself from the harsh sun present in the desert landscapes she painted, she would take out the drivers seat and reverse the passenger seat so that it faced the back. Then, she would place the canvas on the back seat and paint from the passenger seat. This also kept her safe from bees.

Wednesday
Jul122017

Quote of the Day

“Whether you succeed or not is irrelevant, there is no such thing.  Making your unknown known is the important thing.” - Georgia O’Keeffe

Wednesday
May112016

Quote of the Day

“Whether you succeed or not is irrelevant, there is no such thing.  Making your unknown known is the important thing.” - Georgia O’Keeffe

Monday
Feb112013

The Precisionism of Georgia O’Keeffe

Georgia O’Keeffe - The Radiator Building at Night- New York, 1927, oil on canvas, Carl van Vechten Gallery of Fine Arts, Fisk UniversityWe’ve already presented works by Precisionist artists Charles Demuth and Charles Sheeler on What About Art? Precisionism was an artistic movement that emerged in the United States after World War I and was at its height during the inter-War period. The term itself was first coined in the early 1920s. Influenced strongly by Cubism and Futurism, its main themes included industrialization and the modernization of the American landscape, which were depicted in precise, sharply defined, geometrical forms. The themes originated from the streamlined architecture and machinery of the early 1900s. Precisionist artists considered themselves strictly American and tried to avoid European artistic influences. There is a degree of reverence for the industrial age in the movement, and social commentary was not fundamental to the style. The degree of abstraction in Precisionist works ranged considerably. One keen practitioner of it was Georgia O’Keeffe (1887-1986)--with her intense clarity well-defined lines. This is particularly evident in her urban works--which are sometimes forgotten given her association with natural subjects and the New Mexico landscape. But Georgia was also very much an urbanite at certain points in her life--and a Precisionist approach was quite suitable for her renderings of life in the city.

Wednesday
Apr252012

Did You Know?

Henri Matisse’s painting, “Le Bateau” was put the right way up after hanging upside-down for 46 days without anyone noticing at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, America. It happened to Georgia O’Keefee, too, with “The Lawrence Tree” painting.